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cortez/round stingray care

Discussion in 'Aggressive Fish' started by antwon, Dec 12, 2010.

  1. antwon

    antwon New Member

    does anyone have some basic information on the cortez(round) stingray??
  2. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by antwon
    does anyone have some basic information on the cortez(round) stingray??
    I had one for a year and a half....She got so big I donated her to the Jenks Aquarium in Jenks OK.....
    First let me ask you what size tank this is going in?
  3. scott t

    scott t New Member

    Common Name: Cortez StingrayScientific Name: Urobatis maculatusAlias: Cortez Ray, Spotted Round Stingray or Chocolate Chip Ray.
    Maximum Adult Size
    : Maximum total length is about 16.5 inches (42 cm), and a maximum disc width of 9.5 inches (about 24 cm).
    Average Adult Size
    : about 13.8 inches (35 cm) TL, or about 8.0 inches (20 cm)
    Maximum Adult Weight
    : about 1.75 lbs (about 800 grams)
    Size at Birth
    : about 4.7” (12 cm) total length.
    Size at Sexual Maturity
    : about 10" (25cm) total length, about 5.9” (15 cm) disc width.
    Age at Sexual Maturity
    : roughly 2 to 3 years
    Growth Rate
    : averages about 1.1” (2.8 cm) in disk width, & about 1.9” (4.8 cm) in total length per year.
    Longevity of species
    : approx. 8 years.
    Geographical Distribution
    : found in warm-temperate to sub- tropical ocean around Baja California, Sea of Cortez (Gulf of California), and the Mexican Pacific coast.
    Habitat
    : A very abundant small sized warm-temperate to sub- tropical stingray - found to a depth of about 20 meters (65 ft). Prefers sandy shallow bays, rocky reefs, and grassy seabeds.
    Diet
    : mostly bottom dwelling inverts, like shrimp, small crabs, & worms. Also known to feed on small fishes.
    Activity level
    : a fairly active species of stingray. They are active daytime feeders. Basically a fairly harmless species, but like all species of stingrays, it does have a poisonous stinger.
    Preferred Water Temperature & Conditions
    : They seem to prefer a water temperature range of 72-82 F (23-28 C). And Salinity range of 27-33 ppt or 1.020-1.024.
    Minimum recommend pond/tank size for a Cortez Stingray
    : about 180 gallons or 6' long x 2' wide x 2' deep for a single Cortez ray. For a small breeding group of 2-3 adults at least 360 gallons or 8’ long x 3’ wide x 2’ deep.
    The Cortez Stingrays in captivity
    : This species does very well in captivity, and is often found in Home Aquariums and in some Public Aquariums. This species is generally very hardy, and usually acclimates quite well to captive life, provided that it has a good deal of swimming room. This species has also been known to breeding in captivity.
  4. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Scott T
    Maximum Adult Size
    : Maximum total length is about 16.5 inches (42 cm), and a maximum disc width of 9.5 inches (about 24 cm).
    I have to disagree....I had mine a little over a year or so...and it was 18" long and the disc was 12'
    Average Adult Size
    : about 13.8 inches (35 cm) TL, or about 8.0 inches (20 cm)
    LOL....see what I wrote above this
    Maximum Adult Weight
    : about 1.75 lbs (about 800 grams)
    Size at Birth
    : about 4.7” (12 cm) total length.
    When I got mine it was aboout 3"
    Minimum recommend pond/tank size for a Cortez Stingray
    : about 180 gallons or 6' long x 2' wide x 2' deep for a single Cortez ray. For a small breeding group of 2-3 adults at least 360 gallons or 8’ long x 3’ wide x 2’ deep.
    DISAGREE....I had mine in a 225G and she grew out of it in ONE year
    The Cortez Stingrays in captivity
    : This species does very well in captivity, and is often found in Home Aquariums and in some Public Aquariums. This species is generally very hardy, and usually acclimates quite well to captive life, provided that it has a good deal of swimming room. This species has also been known to breeding in captivity.
    I agree, BUT given that the ray has the proper environments.....fine-med sand, LOTS OF BEACH ROOM, fish that will not nip at it.....good foods etc
  5. scott t

    scott t New Member

    That is just what I pulled off the internet.. That was on a good site also.. LOL well sees how much you can trust what is printed out there...
  6. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Scott T
    That is just what I pulled off the internet.. That was on a good site also.. LOL well sees how much you can trust what is printed out there...
    LOL...and another reason I love this site......PERSONAL experiences IMO are much better.....
    I knew that came from a site....not knocking you Scott..I NEVER WOULD :)
    Just adding my personal experiences...SEE when I got mine....I knew nothing about them....I was told they only got to be 6" HAH.....When I got home with her I did some reading, and read max of 10" HAH
  7. deejeff442

    deejeff442 New Member

    the lfs i went to yesterday had a sweet 4 inch ray in an 8 foot tank with a foot long or so shark.
    i havent been to this store in a while like 3 years.he said they had a white tip shark in a pool for a couple years untill it got around four feet long.would have loved to see him.
    this store was awesome almost internet pricing and every fish looked perfect.he also had an 8 inch naso with 3 inch streamers .just awesome looking.
  8. scott t

    scott t New Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by meowzer
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Scott T

    That is just what I pulled off the internet.. That was on a good site also.. LOL well sees how much you can trust what is printed out there...
    LOL...and another reason I love this site......PERSONAL experiences IMO are much better.....
    I knew that came from a site....not knocking you Scott..I NEVER WOULD :)
    Just adding my personal experiences...SEE when I got mine....I knew nothing about them....I was told they only got to be 6" HAH.....When I got home with her I did some reading, and read max of 10" HAH
    I know you would not, thats why I love this site too because of the personal experience that people on here have and are willing to share that information...
  9. antwon

    antwon New Member

    im getting the ray from one of my friends who keeps and sells sharks and rays. he says he gets them about 3 inches. he will go in my 72 as a juvenile only for a little while and then into my 180, and probably just him in there. if need be, if he gets too big i will prob hav to do what u did meowzer, LOL. in my 72, im getting rid of my eel, maybe the wrasse and angel, and taking a lot of live rock out. i also am trying to figure out how to change my substrate because it is not very fine. all of u are probably thinking a 72 is small, i know. i only plan on keeping him in there for like 2 months.
  10. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Antwon...they grow fast....
    BUT....what other fish are in that tank? I used regular aragonite (??) and she did fine....it was not the real coarse stuff
    ALSO, if you have any LR with "sharp" edges, remove them too
  11. antwon

    antwon New Member

    um my LR has pretty round edges, ill try to get u a pic of my sand. it just seems so hard to change sand, and i really want to try to keep a stingray. oh and thanx for not completely blowing up on for saying im putting a cortez ray in my 72 LOL cuz i know a lot of people would have hahah
  12. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Altho I do not agree with the ray in a 72G....You DID say it was only for a couple of months...and to that I did say THEY GROW FAST :)
    YES, from what I read removing substrate is a task.....IMO You will not have to remove all of it.....just siphon some out here and there....not too fast...and then slowly add the new stuff
    PLEASE make sure you have a MUCH BIGGER tank ready though.....these rays are magnificent, and really deserve a large enough home
    I will say that a 180 will not house it after it gets as big as mine was......just watching it swim will show you that
  13. antwon

    antwon New Member

    this is what my sand looks like. sorry bout the quality...its my laptop webcam
  14. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Not a bad pic....I do see some larger pieces in there though.....Do you remember what type it was?
    It would probably be best to remove a good amount of it.....and mix in some finer sand...
  15. antwon

    antwon New Member

    no idea, i bought the tank, sand and all, from one of my friends, but at the time i didnt ask him what type it was. im guessing i should change the sand after i rearrange all my rock right? and of these fish: volitan lion, wrasse(dont know wat kind, not reef safe), koran angel, maroon clown, should i be concerned of any of them bothering the ray?? and can i feed him shelled food, such as mussells with the shell on??
  16. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    I would say NO to the lion and the angel......need to know what type of wrasse....post a picture
    and NO DEFINITELY NOT on the shells.....I fed mine raw shrimp, cleaned, shelled, and tenderized when she was a baby, then I alternated between scallops and the shrimp....she LOVED the scallops too......
    As she grew, I did not have to cut the shrimp too small, BUT I did still cut it to mouth size pieces for her.....and I did feed her by hand
  17. antwon

    antwon New Member

    not the best photo...
  18. deejeff442

    deejeff442 New Member

    lunar wrasse?
  19. gemmy

    gemmy Active Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by deejeff442
    lunar wrasse?
    That's my guess, as well.
  20. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Well if it is a lunar wrasse, from what I read it is a peaceful wrasse.....so should be okay

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