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feeding a Derasa Clam

Discussion in 'Clams' started by redc5vette, Dec 10, 2011.

  1. redc5vette

    redc5vette New Member

    Whats the best store bought food for them?
  2. snakeblitz33

    snakeblitz33 Active Member

    Live cultured and refrigerated phytoplankton. I fed DT's brand. But there are several others that are really good.
    Of course the best to feed is live home grown phyto.
    How big is the clam?
  3. redc5vette

    redc5vette New Member

    ok so i was on the right page with food. I did get some kent liquid calcium. and I almost bought a thing of phyto and the other kind of plankton cant remember what its called haha. but its around 3.5-4 in. long, very very colorful I ordered it from the site when they were offering free shipping on your order if you bought it and I wanted a pistol shrimp and goby so I figured why not. It is the second one I have had. sadly the first one was killed by a giant hermit crab the night after I had it shipped to my house. Also how do you grow your own foods I have always been curious about that "sending a link will be just fine if thats easier" also I have read they like being on the sandy bottom. but I put this one right on top of a coral fossil and it almost instantly attached itself. i hope it stays there because im worried about the traffic on the bottom of the tank disturbing it.
  4. snakeblitz33

    snakeblitz33 Active Member

    It will find somewhere to get comfortable. It has a little foot and will move itself where it wants to go.
    All it takes to grow your own phyto is some 2 liter plastic coke bottles, a light source on a timer, some saltwater, an air pump, airline tubing, check valve, gang valve(s), microalgae grow fertilizer, and a live phytoplankton culture. If you think about it, you will figure out how to put everything together. There are also many, many DIY links out there that will help if you do a Google search.
    If you grow your own phyto, you can learn to culture your own other live foods, like rotifers and enriched brine shrimp. Feeding live foods is perhaps the absolute best nutrition you can give your fish and corals. If I had the space, I would be culturing my own live foods... which I intend to do when I get a bigger place.
    Be careful with that liquid calcium. Calcium has to be added in equal parts with alkalinity, and will not be effective unless you also have high/stable magnesium levels as well. I highly suggest you read some threads that have to do with balancing calcium and alkalinity.
  5. bang guy

    bang guy Moderator Staff Member

    Cryopaste is a reasonably convenient and nutritionus food.
  6. redc5vette

    redc5vette New Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SnakeBlitz33
    If you grow your own phyto, you can learn to culture your own other live foods, like rotifers and enriched brine shrimp. Feeding live foods is perhaps the absolute best nutrition you can give your fish and corals. If I had the space, I would be culturing my own live foods... which I intend to do when I get a bigger place.
    I intend to do the same once we move. my plan is to have an entire room for just my saltwater hobby/lifestyle haha. Right now I only feed the fish a mixture of frozen foods. Also on the calcium I have not opened the bottle yet I plan on making sure I'm 100% correct on the steps it takes to add it to the aquarium I just knew they need a perfect calcium mix so i figured it would be best to have it on standby. I do use some of the purple up product. I know its suppose to raise the calcium a bit. But again that will be a slow process too. Do you guys target feed the clam or just but it in infront of your power head. I used to feed my anemones I had in my last tank by target feeding from about a foot away so I wouldnt scare the little creatures haha
  7. snakeblitz33

    snakeblitz33 Active Member

    A 4" long clam should barely be big enough to get at least half its nutrition from your lighting. The other half has to come from filterfeeding. Feed as much phyto as your filtration will allow. Turn your skimmer off for a few hours after you feed, so that it doesn't completely skim out all of your phyto before it has a chance to be eaten. Clams that are smaller than 4" need to be put in a clean glass bowl with tank water and a small powerhead and heater and be fed live phytoplankton and be kept in the bowl for 15 to 30 minutes while it feeds. Gotta do it about once a week until the clam grows up more.
    Yup, read up more on calcium and alkalinity and magnesium. There's a delicate process about it. Make sure you don't dose calcium in your tank without actually knowing what your calcium and alkalinity look like.
  8. gemmy

    gemmy Active Member

    I have a derasa that is about 4-5 inches across and I have never spot fed it. I have good lighting and keep my tank well fed. The clam has been in my tank for over a year.
  9. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gemmy
    I have a derasa that is about 4-5 inches across and I have never spot fed it. I have good lighting and keep my tank well fed. The clam has been in my tank for over a year.
    +1
  10. redc5vette

    redc5vette New Member

    I dont even have my skimmer running yet so thats not a problem haha. And thank you for the extra info, I enjoy hearing everything you guys have to say, especially since this is my first clam I plan on keeping alive haha.
  11. snakeblitz33

    snakeblitz33 Active Member

    Clams are cool, but a lot of responsibility. They are actually pretty delicate creatures who enjoy Prestine water conditions and lots and lots of light. Good luck. If it doesn't live, don't get discouraged. Figure out why it didn't and fix it.
  12. redc5vette

    redc5vette New Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SnakeBlitz33
    Clams are cool, but a lot of responsibility. They are actually pretty delicate creatures who enjoy Prestine water conditions and lots and lots of light. Good luck. If it doesn't live, don't get discouraged. Figure out why it didn't and fix it.
    Thank you buddy. lets hope for the best. so far it seems very happy.
  13. florida joe

    florida joe New Member

    A 4 inch clam should be getting the majority of its food from the zooxanthellae which produce photosynthesis-derived food for its host so lighting is your main issue . IMO you should never ever continually move a clam. You can rip its byssal gland
  14. gemmy

    gemmy Active Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by florida joe
    A 4 inch clam should be getting the majority of its food from the zooxanthellae which produce photosynthesis-derived food for its host so lighting is your main issue . IMO you should never ever continually move a clam. You can rip its byssal gland
    +1, However, a derasa is a sand dwelling clam that does not really attach to the substrate.
  15. florida joe

    florida joe New Member

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Gemmy
    +1, However, a derasa is a sand dwelling clam that does not really attach to the substrate.
    This is true of an adult clams over 12 inches in length will in fact loose their abyssal gland I assume the weight of the clam as an adult will keep it stable but IMO juveniles will attempt to anchor themselves to any substrate that they find suitable to keep their mantle exposed to the best intensity of light. That includes your sand substratum.
  16. bang guy

    bang guy Moderator Staff Member

    Derasa are typically in the shallow rocks for the first decade of life. After that they release and let the tides pull them into deeper water where they sit on the sand. You'll not see very many small Derasa in deeper water because they are vulnerable to predators there.
  17. redc5vette

    redc5vette New Member

    I dont move it it has already attached to a rock

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