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New seahorse with a white spot. pic included

Discussion in 'Seahorses & Pipefish' started by elliemaybe, Dec 23, 2008.

  1. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    Anyone have a guess as to what this is? He appears to be in awesome health except for the new spot which can't be good. It's either parasitic, bacterial, or fungal right? Once I have a better idea as to what it is we'll treat it right away. Thanks in advance.
  2. sepulatian

    sepulatian Moderator Staff Member

    I moved this over to the seahorse section for you. The folks here are very knowledgeable on their health and care requirements.
  3. rykna

    rykna New Member

    What type of medicines do you have??? This looks like a flesh erosion disease.
  4. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    We have been treating in-tank with Melafix. The spot is about 6 times larger. We are about to try a FW dip but I know it doesn't look good. I'm so bummed because we did everything right..
  5. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    This is what it looks like now... I am, of course, open to suggestions. But I know it looks bad right now.
  6. rykna

    rykna New Member

    Put the little girl into a Hospital tank if you haven't already. Do you have neosporin in your house? If so, grab some Q-tips and put a small amount of the cream on the Q-tip(3-4). Go over to you horse. Gently scoop her(looks like a female?) up and position her flat on your hand with the infected side up. Hold her just barely on the surface of the water. Try to keep her gills in contact with the water. She'll might squirm a little, gently press your thumb on her lower abdomen to steady her, when your ready, take one of the Q-tips and swab the neosporin over the infected area. Cover the infected area just as you would on yourself. If she allows you too, take a few moments to remove any dead tissue, is a Q-tip and do not force any of the skin off.
    After you're finished applying the ointment release her back into the hospital tank.
  7. rykna

    rykna New Member

    I think you horse has one of these:
    Originally Posted by seahorseorg
    Endoparasites (Internal Parasides)
    Protozoans, flatworms, flukes, roundworms, tapeworms, etc.
    Causes/Problems
    Internal parasitic infections are spread in much the same way as external parasitic infections. With proper quarantine and pre-treatment, often internal parasitic infections can be evaded. In many cases, given appropriate water conditions and health, seahorses can live in symbiosis with internal parasites for many years without problems. Additionally, endoparasites are rare with seahorses.
    Symptoms:
    * slow wasting/weight loss
    * sometimes seen protruding from anal opening
    Most commonly, these parasitic worms fix themselves to the infected specimen's digestive tract, constantly consuming nutrients vital to the infected specimen's health. Unless treated, malnutrition follows, leading to death.
    Treatment
    Treatment regimens for internal parasites are similar to those for external parasites. Most commercial anti-protozoal and anti-worm agents are effective at treating internal parasites. They can be administered via gut-loaded ghost shrimp or Artemia, or by injecting the medicines into dead ghost shrimp.
    Metronidazole (flagyl) is an effective treatment against internal protozoan infections. It must be ingested.
    Niclosamide and Praziquantel are both effective against worm infections and must be administered through food to be effective. They may be somewhat difficult to obtain.
    Freshwater Dips can be effective against some endoparasites such as flukes, though they are generally only effective at treating ectoparasites.
    Ectoparasites (External Parasites)
    Cryptocaryon irritans, Amyloodinium (Oodinium) ocellatum, Brooklynella hostilis, parasitic crustaceans, gill flukes, Glugea, etc.
    Causes/Problems
    Ectoparasitic infections are most often caused by poor quarantine and pre-treatment practices. Most wild fish, including seahorses, routinely harbour ectoparasites with no problems. When infected fish are put through the stress of capture and transportation, weeks in holding facilities without food, and the sometimes volatile conditions that can occur in closed systems such as aquariums, their immune systems are weakened, and the parasites are given a chance to overtake their host. With proper quarantine and treatment before being placed in the display aquarium, often ectoparasites can be eradicated with ease.
    Symptoms:
    * visible parasites upon examination manifested as white spots, ulcerations, blisters, etc.
    * cloudy eyes
    * scratching on substrate
    * wild or erratic behaviour
    * signs of stress (washed out coloration, rapid breathing, etc.)
    External parasites can cause death by several means, the most common being direct parasitism (stealing vital nutrients from another organism's blood or other bodily fluid), suffocation, and opening the gates for secondary infections. External parasites can consume so much of their host's nutrients that the host may wither and die from malnutrition. Suffocation can be caused by severe infestation of the gills (gill flukes). Also, parasites often cause open sores along the body of their host, and this, compounded with stress due to lack of adequate nutrition, leads to internal secondary infection, usually by a bacterium.
    Treatment
    The best treatment for any parasitic disease is prevention by careful quarantine. If this is not feasible and parasites do emerge in the display tank, treatment options are wide. They must, however, be used in a quarantine tank.
    Formalin is one of the most common and economical chemical treatments for external protozoans and flukes. It is best used as a dip per the instructions of the manufacturer.
    Malachite Green is an effective chemical dye that can be used in treating most external parasites. Use as an extended treatment in quarantine per manufacturer's instructions.
    Methylene Blue is a common medication with seahorses. Its therapeutic properties lessen some of the stress brought about by disease treatment. Use it as a dip or as a long-term quarantine treatment.
    Freshwater Dips are extremely effective against gill flukes. Be sure to match the pH and temperature of the tank's water before proceeding with a dip of this kind.
  8. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    Rykna,
    Thank you so much for your response. I have him in a QT tank with Furan-2 to treat it as flesh-erosion disease. I have the lights out and just a fake plant for him to anchor onto. I am about to do the neosporin, but I'm a little afraid. I will try and let you know how he does. It doesn't look good but I'm giving it my all!
  9. meowzer

    meowzer Moderator Staff Member

    I am wishing you all the luck with your horse..
  10. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    Okay, I got 4 q-tips dipped in neosporin and picked him up (i think it's a boy?) and as soon as i ran the q-tip over the area, all the black and white yucky stuff kinda melted off revealing all white skin. I covered the area with the ointment and let him go. He's just kinda laying there and my fingers are crossed but it'll take a miracle. I'll let you know how it goes. It sounds corny but, I love the little guy and it's really sad. :(
  11. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    Thank you, Meowzer!
  12. zeke92

    zeke92 New Member

    Originally Posted by Elliemaybe

    Okay, I got 4 q-tips dipped in neosporin and picked him up (i think it's a boy?) and as soon as i ran the q-tip over the area, all the black and white yucky stuff kinda melted off revealing all white skin. I covered the area with the ointment and let him go. He's just kinda laying there and my fingers are crossed but it'll take a miracle. I'll let you know how it goes. It sounds corny but, I love the little guy and it's really sad. :(
    It's not corny, alot of people are attatched to there fish.
    Good luck with your fish, i don't really know anything else i could possibly add that rykna didn't
  13. rykna

    rykna New Member

    We'll all be praying for your little horse. And as zeke92 said, it's not silly, I name and love all my fish....especially my seahorses. So I posted this thread many months ago.
    http://forums.saltwaterfish.com/t/295520/so-you-want-a-seahorse
    "Seahorses are the most unique fish I have ever had the pleasure of sharing my home with. I do not say keeping, because even though all fish have personalities, there is more to a seahorse. The intelligence that flickers in their eyes as they watch you, and the recognition and trust they form with you...takes them far beyond any fish I have ever kept. Sasha and Saphire have shown me trust by not fleeing when I go into the tank to get their food dish.They simply move around the dish as I take it out to clean, and wait for me to replace it and fill it with fresh mysis."
  14. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    I lost him It was soooo sad. I thank all of you for the well wishes and information. Hopefully, this will be the last time this happens.
    Rykna, I read the thread you linked below plus all of the ones linked in that thread. I have some learning to do.
    I am going to read all of the threads on the seahorse board again and if I still have questions (I'm sure I will :) ) I know I can ask you all.
    Thank you all-
    Jennifer
  15. reefnutpa

    reefnutpa New Member

    Sorry I didn't see this post earlier. Melafix is useless in combating any flesh erosion/Vibrio infection in seahorses. A test done with it (and PimaFix) did not show any reduction in pathogen growth/virulence when tested against common seahorse pathogens. Additionally, it reduces the oxygen in the water.
    With that said, definitely looked like a bacterial infection/flesh erosion/Vibrio infection. A 10 day treatment of Neomycin combined with TripleSulpha OR Furan2 would have been the treatment recommended.
    High temps (76F+) accelerate the reproduction of pathogens such as this, which is why a temp of 72F-74F is recommended for all seahorses - even tropical species. Exception, of course, being the cold water species such as Pots, capensis, etc.
    Sorry things didn't work out :(
    Tom
  16. rykna

    rykna New Member

    Originally Posted by Elliemaybe

    I lost him It was soooo sad. I thank all of you for the well wishes and information. Hopefully, this will be the last time this happens.
    Rykna, I read the thread you linked below plus all of the ones linked in that thread. I have some learning to do.
    I am going to read all of the threads on the seahorse board again and if I still have questions (I'm sure I will :) ) I know I can ask you all.
    Thank you all-
    Jennifer
    I'm so sorry for your loss Jennifer. Their little prehensile tails hitch to your heart. Hang in there
    If you're up to it I'd like to know what kind of set up you have, and would be very happy to help you with any questions.
    ~Rykna
  17. elliemaybe

    elliemaybe New Member

    Thank you so much, Rykna! I actually did start a thread asking for some advice for my next go-round and would be honored if you'd take a peek at my questions! -blush- ;)

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