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Purple Tree Coral

Discussion in 'Corals' started by member007, May 26, 2008.

  1. member007

    member007 New Member

    What's up guys! I found a rare coral at my LFS called Purple Tree Coral (pic attached). I was told that it is not a carnation, and that is easy to keep alive. Can someone please tell me if this is true. The only info I was able to find on line was about Taylor's Purple Tree Coral:
    Taylor's Purple Tree Coral (Nephthea sp.)
    Care Level: Easy
    Temperament: Peaceful
    Lighting: Moderate
    Waterflow: Medium to Strong
    Placement: Middle to Top
    Water Conditions: 72-78° F, sg 1.023-1.025, pH 8.1-8.4, dKH 8-12
    Color Form: Purple
    Supplements: Iodine, Strontium, Trace Elements
    Origin: Aquacultured - Drs. Foster & Smith
    Family: Nephtheidae
    The Taylor's Purple Tree Coral is boldly colored in purple hues that dress any home reef aquarium. This noteworthy color variety is a dramatic contrast to the softer yellow and green coloration commonly associated with other members of the Nephtheidae family. Most importantly, the Taylor's Purple Tree Coral is aquacultured for guaranteed health without placing additional strain on our ocean's fragile reef system.
    This soft coral is peaceful but still needs ample space between itself and others in the reef aquarium. The Taylor's Purple Tree Coral is easy to maintain in the reef aquarium, and will require moderate lighting conditions combined with medium to strong water movement. For continued good health, the Taylor's Purple Tree Coral will also require the addition of iodine, strontium, and other trace elements to the water.
    The symbiotic algae zooxanthellae hosted within its body provide some of the nutritional needs via the light driven process of photosynthesis. The Taylor's Purple Tree Coral will also require feedings of food such as micro-plankton, baby brine shrimp, or foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates. These should be regularly blown across the polyps.
    Is this the same thing?
  2. mx#28

    mx#28 New Member

    Looks like Neospongodes, although I'm not quite 100% sure. Either way, for any of the corals that look like this, the husbandry will be very similar to what you've posted. They are photosynthetic, but definitely need food, too.
  3. cowfishrule

    cowfishrule New Member

    looks ALOT like a carnation.
    ****** watch the links cowfish you know they arent allowed***
    Dendronephthya sp.
    Quick Stats: Carnation/Tree Coral
    Family: Nephtheidae
    Range: South Pacific
    Color Form: Orange, Purple, Red
    Ideal Supplements: Iodine, Strontium, Trace elements
    Reef Compatible: Yes
    Tank Conditions: 72-78ºF; sg 1.023-1.025; pH 8.1-8.4
    Water Flow: Medium to Strong
    Light: Low
    Dominance: Peaceful
    Placement: All levels
    Care Level: Experts only
    The Dendronephthya Carnation or Tree Coral is one of the most beautiful and peaceful corals, and is also known as the Cauliflower Soft Coral, or Strawberry Soft Coral. There are over 250 different identified Dendronephthyaspecies. It is found in a variety of flamboyant colors with red or orange being the most common.
    It is extremely difficult to maintain in the reef aquarium, and should be housed in an established reef aquarium, by the more advanced marine aquarist. It requires low lighting combined with medium to strong water movement. It is necessary to have a constant current with an abundance of algal plankton. For continued good health, it will also require the addition of strontium, iodine, and other trace elements to the water.
    It does not contain the symbiotic algae zooxanthellae. Therefore, its diet should include live, baby brine shrimp, micro-plankton, and other small foods designed for filter feeding invertebrates, in order to survive in the reef aquarium. These foods must be available almost constantly. Again, only expert aquarists should attempt to keep this coral.
  4. mx#28

    mx#28 New Member

    Originally Posted by COWFISHRULE

    looks ALOT like a carnation.
    I'm not so sure, becuase I can't see any sclerites on the stalk at all - A prominent feature of Dendronepthya or Scleronepthya (it is also taller than the typical Scleronepthya). It appears to be smooth-stalked like Nepthea, etc, but has color and bunched up, spikey polyps like I've seen on the Neospongodes. Again, I'm not sure it's that, but I DO think it's on of the semi-photosynthetic softies and not what we call 'carnations'.
  5. member007

    member007 New Member

    I don't think it is a carnation. The picture was taken before the polyps opened. The coral has brown tiny polyps... I will try to take a better picture. Hopefully someone can helpwith ID.
  6. reefforbrains

    reefforbrains New Member

    What does it physically feel like?
    Carnations look soft but are very firm fleshed, almost abrasive to the touch. They react to touch but much slower than tree corals. Tree's close within a second or two. Dendro go slower.
    I saw a ton of what was being called "purple passion tree" being passed around many shops in past months but they ARE carnations. Scientific names and exact names to the birds. If it is extremley firm to the touch it is more carnation than tree and should be treated as such IMO.
    Carnations are NOT impossible but its a entirley different animal than a typical softie tree.
    my vote is Carny Sub of some type.
  7. reefforbrains

    reefforbrains New Member


    This look about right? Pics are from my tank before my last trip. Def not EASY to keep. Least not easy to keep for long term
    . I thought they were going to just be like hybrid Purple kenya or something of that nature, but they were finiky and difficult to keep happy. Needed loads of food and loads of flow. Did have them successfully grow and spread but it was a true balancing act in water quality with how much I was feeding that tank.
  8. member007

    member007 New Member

    Originally Posted by ReefForBrains


    This look about right? Pics are from my tank before my last trip. Def not EASY to keep. Least not easy to keep for long term
    . I thought they were going to just be like hybrid Purple kenya or something of that nature, but they were finiky and difficult to keep happy. Needed loads of food and loads of flow. Did have them successfully grow and spread but it was a true balancing act in water quality with how much I was feeding that tank.
    This is it, thanks!

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