Bleached GBTA?

35% Off ! All WYSIWYG fish and corals
#1
So I had a orbit led light that was 30 watts and I learned I’m supposed to have 5 watts per gallon my tank is 33 gallon tall so I bought a 165watt light. The mars aqua 165w and set it up 12 inches above as suggested my nem seem to enjoy it. I had the light at a 100% which now I realize was a mistake and I might have burn/bleached some of my corals. I watched a video where he explained that they are strong and to start of with 30%color and 70%blue lights so I moved it to that for now and fed my nem some mysis. The last two pictures are before the new light when it was more green
 

Attachments

lmforbis

Administrator
Staff member
#2
It doesn’t look particularly bleached. It has more green color under the new lights but that could just be the lights. Bleached would be very pale beige to white. With LEDS the Watts per gallon doesn’t really apply. That said Anemomes need a lot of light. They will do better under the mars aqua. When I add something new to a high light environment I start with it turned really low then slowly increase intensity overa couple weeks. You can accomplish the same thing by starting the light high and gradually moving it closer to the water.
 
#3
It doesn’t look particularly bleached. It has more green color under the new lights but that could just be the lights. Bleached would be very pale beige to white. With LEDS the Watts per gallon doesn’t really apply. That said Anemomes need a lot of light. They will do better under the mars aqua. When I add something new to a high light environment I start with it turned really low then slowly increase intensity overa couple weeks. You can accomplish the same thing by starting the light high and gradually moving it closer to the water.
Ok I have the color light around 24 percent at about 13 inches above water level and my blues are around 35 the anemone only looked green to me in the too images with the most light but that’s with the orbit light on not the new one. Why does the wattage no apply to led?
 

lmforbis

Administrator
Staff member
#4
Wattage is a measure of the rate of energy transfer. Energy isn’t just light but also heat. That isn’t the same with different kinds of lights. If you go to the store and buy an 11 watt LED light bulb it will say on the package it is equivalent to a 60 watt incandescent bulb. What is important is the amount of light produced not the rate of energy transferred, and LEDs produce more light per watt. If you look at the 11 watt LED bulb vs the 60 watt incandescent example they both put out similar amounts of light but have vastly different wattages. The other important part is the correct wavelength of light. You can have a huge amount of light but if it isn’t the correct wavelength it is like having very little light. Anemones need light in the UV and blue spectrums.
 
#5
Wattage is a measure of the rate of energy transfer. Energy isn’t just light but also heat. That isn’t the same with different kinds of lights. If you go to the store and buy an 11 watt LED light bulb it will say on the package it is equivalent to a 60 watt incandescent bulb. What is important is the amount of light produced not the rate of energy transferred, and LEDs produce more light per watt. If you ilook at the 11 watt LED bulb vs the 60 watt incandescent example they both put out similar amounts of light but have vastly different wattages. The other important part is the correct wavelength of light. You can have a huge amount of light but if it isn’t the correct wavelength it is like having very little light. Anemones need light in the UV and blue spectrums.
So how do i know if I have the correct wave length? I have the light at a very dim setting rn with my blues a little higher than my color. The anemone is more near the top of the tank. I’ve seen people or rather read that people remove a part of the light so it’s more wide spread and less focused and turn the lights up higher. Not sure if that has anything to do with wave length
 

lmforbis

Administrator
Staff member
#6
Wave tenth is specific to the LEDs used. I’d tend toward a higher blue then the full spectrum just increase lighting slowly, a little bit every day or two.
 

lmforbis

Administrator
Staff member
#11
Fish no, corals, depends on the coral but most will adjust and then thrive as long as they are slowly acclimated. I had two of those fixtures on my 40 gallon breeder which is very shallow, specifically to support anemones.
 
#12
Fish no, corals, depends on the coral but most will adjust and then thrive as long as they are slowly acclimated. I had two of those fixtures on my 40 gallon breeder which is very shallow, specifically to support anemones.
U had both blue lights and the spectrum at 100% wow. I’ve been feeding the anemone 3-4 times a week and idk what I’m doing wrong adjusting slowly to light my water perimeters are rlly good but some of the tentacles are shriveled up ?
 
Top