Bought a frag from my LFS

Discussion in 'Fragging Techniques' started by Mandymae, Sep 13, 2015.

  1. Mandymae

    Mandymae New Member

    20150910_204011.jpeg Should I do anything specific to help it prosper?
     
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  2. bang guy

    bang guy Administrator Staff Member

    Good light, good current, Calcium & Alkalinity in good levels. The more you target feed them the faster they will reproduce.
     
    Mandymae likes this.
  3. bang guy

    bang guy Administrator Staff Member

    Were they labeled "Protopalythoa"?
     
  4. Mandymae

    Mandymae New Member

    You know, I dont recall. But I'm going today to get water I will look / ask.
     
  5. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    Look like protos to me, too. For heaven's sake... don't feed them! Two or three will turn into dozens in no time with just good lighting and water conditions. I'd rather mine be a little hungry than to have to thin them out. Just saying...
     
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  6. Mandymae

    Mandymae New Member

    I'm new to all of this. So are these something I shouldn't have bought? Or is it they multiply fast?
     
  7. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    They're fine additions to a tank. Under good conditions, they multiply rather quickly. Sorry... I didn't mean to scare you. LOL!!!
     
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  8. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    This colony had about 5-6 polyps when I placed them in my 40B about six months ago...

    20150913_103811A.jpg
     
  9. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    This colony started with a single polyp about a year ago...

    20150913_104702A.jpg
     
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  10. Mandymae

    Mandymae New Member

    Ok well that makes me feel better. This is the first coral I've bought so, buying one that was 50, 100 dollars just didn't make sense. Thanks
     
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  11. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    Congrats on getting your first coral, Mandy! The "beginner" corals are usually fairly cheap. If you're not careful, a time will come when $50 to $100 for a coral isn't too awfully bad... if you want it bad enough. :eek:
     
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  12. Kristin1234

    Kristin1234 Active Member

    I have some of these as well. I thought they were some kind of polyp, I target feed them coral frenzy and they do multiply quickly. I had just one and within about 6 weeks I now have like 7 polyps!
     
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  13. Mandymae

    Mandymae New Member

    20150913_142139.jpg I did have some questions about lighting. I have 18 in T8 15 watt white and actinic blue as well as some small led white. I don't know what is what but this is what I have. Should I have another spectrum? As you can see in the picture it is brighter on the right side (led) and more blue on the left. Because of the 2 -15watt -t8
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
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  14. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    Is this your new 55? How many 18" T8 bulbs does your lighting have? While visible light is good for our viewing pleasure, it's more important to provide corals what they need. You should think about what you want the tank to look like a few years from now. Do you envision it with a few soft corals? Lots of soft corals? Soft corals and a few LPS corals? Soft corals, LPS, and SPS corals? I know it's a hard question, but the time to plan and prepare for the future tank of your dreams is now.

    I don't want to sound like I'm critiquing your tank, but I'd like to point out that you could use a few more rocks in the tank. Quite a few more. You have a nice sand bed which will help with natural filtration, but rocks are equally as important. It's not something that has to be done right away, since the tank is lightly inhabited, but something to consider before adding too many additions to the tank. I don't recall the type of size of the HOB filter. If it's one that uses carbon and floss filter pads, it isn't going to provide the filtration needed for a stocked tank. As it is, you'll be looking at doing a good many water changes to keep the nasties at an acceptable level. Adequate surface area of rocks well certainly help with processing a lot of the waste in the tank. Just something to keep in mind...
     
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  15. kdsealyon

    kdsealyon Member

    How beautiful!
     
  16. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    Thank you! I bought a coral that came with the rock it was growing on, and a single polyp of this was also attached. Buying corals can come with a few surprises, and most of them are pleasant surprises. It's nice to get little "bonuses" along the way... lol!
     
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  17. Mandymae

    Mandymae New Member

    Yes this is the new 55. I had a 20 gal before. I have bought 2 more LR about 12lbs since going bigger. But yes still have more to go. I have no idea what LPS SPS are, I know corals. But at this point I have a lot of learning to do and limited $. the tank and stand along with many other accessories kinda came to us (we weren't looking) 115$ it fell unexpectedly into our lap.. of course I couldn't pass it up. I do appreciate all of the experienced advice. That's why I joined this forum, in hopes of gaining more knowledge...thank you
     
  18. kdsealyon

    kdsealyon Member

    I was hoping I would get a surprise with the live rock I bought, but nothing there but some pink algae.. Oh well.
     
  19. Mandymae

    Mandymae New Member

    Oh, and as far as filters they are all HOB.. but I have 1 single and a double with bio wheels a very small one with bio wheel and 1 regular. So 4 all together
     
  20. pegasus

    pegasus Well-Known Member

    Sorry about that.

    LPS stands for Large Polyp Stony. Most of these corals are photosynthetic, which means they have zooxanthellae algae living inside their bodies. This algae uses photosynthesis to create sugar that the corals use for energy. In return, the coral provides the algae with a safe place to live. These corals also have mouths to feed on small crustaceans and particulate. Some have hard, calcareous skeletons which require adequate Magnesium, Alkalinity, Calcium, and trace minerals to grow. Some have soft skeletons, which aren't as demanding. LPS corals are typically good for beginner to advanced hobbyists, with a few recommended for experts only.

    SPS stands for Small Polyp Stony. These are a bit more difficult to raise, and normally recommended for advanced to expert hobbyists. Most of them require excellent lighting and water conditions. Like LPS, they're mostly photosynthetic. They have tiny mouths that feed on very small particles.

    $115 is a heck of a deal! Of course you couldn't pass it up! LOL!!!

    You never know. Sometimes little critters will slip in under the radar, and you may not notice them for a long time. A lot of marine critters are experts at hiding in tiny crooks and crannies in the rocks. It's not unusual to find new things in the tank a few days, weeks, or months after adding a new rock or coral. Of course, you should dip corals before adding them to our tanks, because every once in awhile, a not-so-friendly hitchhiker may tag along.
     
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