Reef tank filtration

Discussion in 'Tips and Techniques' started by Peterbuff, Nov 16, 2016.

  1. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    hey guys I recently got a 72 bow front tank with a pro clear wet dry sump and I wanna do a reef tank and I'm not sure what media to get for it ans how much filtration I need to have a decent amount of fish. I also have a coral life 65 skimmer, a mag 7 return pump and over flow box. Also I need help finding a way to protect against syphon breaks on the overflow box. Thanks!!
     
  2. geridoc

    geridoc Well-Known Member

    I would run the sump as a straight sump without any W/D filter media. Such media are designed to be highly aerobic, which is great for eliminating ammonia and nitrite, but it produces lots of nitrate. For fish-only systems this is fine, but many reef organisms won't tolerate nitrates. Instead, put some macroalgae in the sump along with some inexpensive lighting, and let the algae take out the nitrogen compounds (with help from the live rock in your display).
     
  3. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    So just my regular sponge and refugium and what about if i wanna keep slot of fish in a reef and thank you
     
  4. florida joe

    florida joe Well-Known Member

    The amount of fish you have is not predicated on the amount of filtration, it is the amount of nitrification and denitrification that dictates how many fish you can have. Geridoc how does W/D media produce lots of nitrates? The amounts of nitrates produce are a result of nitrification which is keyed into how much biological breakdown is in your tank. W/D media cannot add anymore nitrates to your tank then are normally introduced
     
  5. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    So how can I have a lot of fish, what measures do I have to take in order to have a lot of fish
     
  6. florida joe

    florida joe Well-Known Member

    The number of fish you can have is a direct correlation to the size of the tank you have.

    The general rule is one inch overall length of fish for every 5 gallons of water BUT that does not take into consideration bio load due to what the feeding requirements of the fish you are keeping. How much rock work you add to your tank which will displace water. In the saltwater hobby when it comes to fish less is better
     
  7. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    Oh ok but I see other tanks that have a lot of fish and it's fine how do they do it
     
  8. florida joe

    florida joe Well-Known Member

    simple they are not looking at the long term, its easy when you care more about looking good now and not about being a conscientious hobbyist. they load up their tank when a fish dies well so be it they buy another. Is that the type of hobbyist you want to be ?
     
  9. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    But I think looks like it's really successful
     
  10. florida joe

    florida joe Well-Known Member

    post a picture of it please
     
  11. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    the file is too big to send but it's basically a 120 with a bunch of small fish and medium sized fish then a few big fish the biggest was a mid sized yellow tang and a bunch of rock and corals
     
  12. florida joe

    florida joe Well-Known Member

    exactly how much is a bunch and a few ?
     
  13. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    It had like 10 medium chromis, 3 small Anthias, one or two medium sized tangs, and like 5 other misc fish all small to medium
     
  14. deejeff0442

    deejeff0442 Active Member

    Google Japan salt fish tanks.
    They pack them in like freshwater .
     
  15. Peterbuff

    Peterbuff Member

    How do they do it
     
  16. geridoc

    geridoc Well-Known Member

    The first two steps in denitrification are highly aerobic, which is exactly the condition on the surface of a W/D filter, and the output of these steps is nitrate. The final step, conversion of nitrate to nitrogen gas, is anaerobic, and occurs in the deeper parts of the sand bed, or using export, such as macroalgae. A W/D is very efficient in producing nitrates, but the final conversion is generally considerably slower, which is why nitrate accumulates.
     
  17. florida joe

    florida joe Well-Known Member

    umm i am sure you mean the first two steps in nitrification
     
  18. geridoc

    geridoc Well-Known Member

    "Nitrification" is a 3 step process in which toxic ammonia is converted into non-toxic nitrogen gas. The fist two steps, ammonia to nitrite and nitrite into nitrate require oxygen, but the final step, conversion of nitrate into nitrogen gas, must occur in the absence of oxygen.
     
  19. florida joe

    florida joe Well-Known Member

    Thank you for the clarification on nitrification. I just need a little more Enlightenment if you please. I always thought the three step process in “nitrification” was ammonia (NH³ or NH³+4), nitrite (NO²), and nitrate (NO³). A completely different process then “Denitrification. Denitrification I always believed was through two pathways. Dissimilatory nitrate reduction and assimilatory reduction. Have I been wrong all these years?
     
  20. lmforbis

    lmforbis Well-Known Member

    nitrificatiin is the breakdown of ammonia to nitrite and nitrate. Denitrification is the final step where the nitrogen is removed as nitrogen gas.
     

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