Sea apple care?

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#1
Hello!

I'm very interested in purchasing a sea apple that my lfs has at the moment and would like any personal experiences/ advance if you have any.
I understand that they have the ability to release a toxin when under a great deal of stress (normally from getting sucked into a piece of equipment or getting picked on by a fish from what I've read)
I've been researching like crazy, but if anyone has any extra advice please let me know!

(Also if you have a great link to another forum page that have people that currently own one of these beautiful creatures it would be awesome if you shared
)
Thanks!
 
#2
My advice would be to pass.
If #1 is bypassed
then they require specialized feeding. Oyster eggs or some type of heavy zooplankton should do it but be careful of maintaining tank parameters with all the extra feeding they require.
The toxin they have only affects vertebrates. It will not harm coral. But the second issue is if you manage to get one into good health, and it's a female, it could release eggs. The eggs are also toxic and will kill any fish that tried to eat them.
The toxin can also make YOU very sick so don't take it lightly.
 
#4
I think they have to be dissected to determine that. Although, if they are severly stressed they will sometimes expel their internal organs and if eggs are present then it's a female.
They are pretty exotic looking, I wish they were more easily cared for. Most stores will tell you they filter detritus from the water column. I do not believe this to be true.
The good news is that if they are not getting adequate food they will start to shrink to match the food supply so you will have plenty of notice that they are starving.
 
#5
Is it common that they'd lay eggs in the aquarium? I'm thinking that if I were to get the sea apple it would be in about 3 weeks from now (when my lfs is having a big sale) that way I'll be able to see it again and judge if it still looks healthy.
 
#7
So if they do happen to shrival up and die do they still release the toxins? I've heard that they don't, but I'm wondering since the toxins seem to be the reason why most people don't want them. Also, I was thinkimf of feeding it a mixture of phytoplankton about 2 times a day to make sure it gets a chance to eat. I think my biggest concern right now is having it either A) get sucked into a powerhead B) have my anemone, urchin, or pygmy angel bother it. Thanks for a the replies!
 
#8
There is some debate and I'm not a biologist but I don't think they can eat phytoplankton.
I don't think anything you mentioned will perster one except the powerhead.
 

florida joe

Well-Known Member
#10
search the internet for Aquarium Invertebrates: Sea Apples by Rob Toonen, PH.D. its a great piece if you have not read it, do so
PS Bang have you read this info by Toonen
 
#13
Well, from the article I have the feeding backwards, apologies. I suppose that is good news as Phyto is MUCH easier to feed than Zooplankton. I would still caution about water parameters. You'll need a good way to export all of those added nutrients.
 
#14
Yeah, I'm thinking I might try feeding my tank now a little more and start siphoning the sand for extra nutrients, so I can see if I can keep up with it now.
I'm really just worried about the apple getting picked at/overly stressed and "vomiting" up its guts. :sad: Mostly because the powerheads I have seem a little risky. Do you think I should hold off until I get my vortech "wavemaker" if I were to get one?
 
#16
I'm not sure if that's a possibility ATM. That would have been my first choice, but since I can't I'm trying to get other options. :p Well any other animals that are very similer, but no so deadly as an option? :)
And I'm just a little skeptical of nanos as the water quality can plummet much more quickly...
 
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