Macroalgae ID

Shilpan

Member
Oh Joe I agree with you! Water changes will only mask the problem, the rocks will still leach until they're finished leaching.

That's why I've been trying to think of ways to deal with nitrates without a water change.

But yeah but I'll just wait until the nitrates stop rising. And then work out the best way to remove em after, which seems to Be water change, macro and patience as you put it. This macro seems good. I added the chaeto. This is insane I saw a couple new branches after one day. I've never seen something grow so fast.
 

Shilpan

Member
Hahahahaha what if I encourage an algae bloom in my tank and all the green hair algae will wipe those nitrates out!!

Imagine the cleaning...
 

2quills

Well-Known Member
Hahahahaha what if I encourage an algae bloom in my tank and all the green hair algae will wipe those nitrates out!!

Imagine the cleaning...
I thought that's what we wanted to avoid?

Once it's in there it's very difficult to get out. That's why I chose to establish algae in my sump first and foremost so that doesn't happen.

What are you using for your water source? RO/DI or tap?
 

florida joe

Well-Known Member
I actually think it takes that long a time for anaerobic colony’s to establish themselves to the extent that is needed to deal with nitrates on their own. As you know there are many factors involved in the advection needed for the anaerobic bacteria to grow and do their job. I may have just lucked out on the placement of my returns and water movement pumps. I actually stopped dosing to see if my nitrates would start to climb. They did but a lot less than I thought. At that point I wanted to see if I had enough anaerobic bacteria to keep them manageable by just doing routine water changes. As far as the algae on my rocks. I have an extensive cleanup crew. 35 snails 20 assorted crabs they keep my rocks clean of nuisance algae and I am left with nice non-articulated coralline algae.
 

2quills

Well-Known Member
OK, I'm glad we got that cleared up.

Just need to wait x amount of years, do routine water changes and hope we get lucky.

I feel much better now lol. No need to experiment.
 

florida joe

Well-Known Member
First I’m not TELLING anyone what to do I am just making suggestions. IMO for someone so early in the game why experiment let the system mature first. You posted . Joe, my friend. If you can find me one members tank on this site or any site that have undetectable nitrates without either of those 3 things I will eat my words.



Youre either under stocking (which I tend to lean towards), under feeding or both. It isn't impossible, just highly uncommon. In my experience (which isn't that vast) tends to lead me to believe that nitrifying bacteria tends to out compete denitrifying bacteria for real estate. What other reason could there be for so many people to have measurable nitrates but not the others? Am I missing something?

Again I can only speak for myself so YES I found the one person on this site that has undetectable nitrates. And does not use either of the three you mention. now what was that about eating your own words
 

Shilpan

Member
Hmm yeah can't beat a matured system that's true.

Oh I was joking about the algae quill, I know :) and yup I'm using RODI water! Make it myself
 

2quills

Well-Known Member
Not to be a stickler for detail but water changes was one of the 3 things that was mentioned.

Shilpan was looking for a way to reduce nitrate without water changes.

Ya know I just gotta give u a hard time Joe. :)
 

florida joe

Well-Known Member
Its all good my-friend :) how else would these nubes learn. Now my turn i do my water testing just before water changes. I personally am not a slave to water changes and only do 10 percent a month. That being said i do not have any noticeable nitrates within 30 days of my last water change
 

Shilpan

Member
When I begin I should just do regular water chnges eh?
I was thinking 10% biweekly.

Or I should it better to chnge according to parameters?
 

bang guy

Moderator
In my experience (which isn't that vast) tends to lead me to believe that nitrifying bacteria tends to out compete denitrifying bacteria for real estate.
I adamantly do not agree with this. The reason is that denitrifying bacteria and nitrifying bacteria are pretty much opposite in preferred real estate. Nitrifying bacteria require highly oxygenated areas and denitrifying bacteria require lowly oxygenated areas.

I will agree that if a hobbyist provides very few low oxygen areas in the system it will not be able to keep up with the Nitrogen level if there are high energy animals in the same system (ie. fish).

That said, if most of the rock and sand was dried out at some point it will take a significant amount of time, if ever, to create the low oxygen areas required for abundant anaerobic bacteria colonies.
 

2quills

Well-Known Member
You always keep me on my toes Bang. Makes perfect sense.

I have patience but not enough to wait years. Macros are alright by me.
 

florida joe

Well-Known Member
First as Bang stated one has to understand the difference between nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria and their requirements to colonize.

Hence aerobic and anaerobic bacteria

This is the basic foundation for a saltwater eco system


Just my .02 on water changes. Way back in the day when I first started a saltwater tank. (early 70s). There was no such thing as a reef tank. Unless you were those experts thinking outside the box. The average hobbyist had ad under gravel filters. Artificial coral and no live rock. Water changes were the only way to reduce nitrate and other organics from our tanks and maintain PH. Enter the brake through of live rock and sand beds. Now we have an ecosystem that can deal with nitrates and help prevent ph. drop. We now have protein skimmers and activated carbon introduced into our water movement. We add supplements to our tanks that were only achieved via water changes. Should a new hobbyist do frequent large water changes? YES but only IMO because he or she may not realize there is a situation in their tank that demands a water change.To my good friend 2quills Patience is a virtue. All good things come to those who wait
 
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florida joe

Well-Known Member
well I can tell you mine. constant water parameters within optimum or near optimum water parameters for at least 8 months. The ability to grow coralline algae. A bio system not dependent on constant water changes
 

lmforbis

Administrator
Staff member
To me it is a tank that has good stable parameters over a long period of time. I think that occurs much faster for some than others and some tanks never get there.
 

Shilpan

Member
A bio system not dependent on constant water changes..

Now that sounds like my sorta tank. Give me like a few years and I'll get there too!!

Haha I just found out one of the other medical students on my ward has a tank! Yay we can discuss fish together hahahaha...
 

2quills

Well-Known Member
I don't have a over abundance of rock in my system. So there aren't very many low flow areas. I even have power heads in my sump so hoping I'll ever get there with anaerobic bacteria is probably wishful thinking for me.

Would that make my system any less legitimate in terms of having stable bio filtration if I use algae vs bacteria to get me there?

Again, why wait years if it isn't necissary?
 
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